Scientist behind Sweden's covid-19 strategy suggests it allowed too many deathsBRUSSELS - For months, the world has watched Sweden's light-touch approach to fighting the coronavirus pandemic, wondering whether it was genius or misguided. On Wednesday, the architect of the strategy said that, in retrospect, he might have pushed something closer to other countries' restrictions. Swedish authorities have consistently denied they were aiming to achieve full-population immunity by keeping much of their public life humming as usual. They said that if they protected the elderly and other vulnerable groups while allowing others to carry on, the country might be more resilient in the face of a second wave of infections and avoid the economic chaos of a total shutdown. Deaths in Sweden, though, have been eight times higher than in Denmark and 19 times higher than in Norway, even though Sweden is only double each neighbors' size. The outbreak appears to be continuing to course through their society, even while most other European countries seem to have gotten things under control, at least for now. And because Sweden's economy is tightly bound to the rest of Europe's, it has also suffered, although not as badly as others. "Should we encounter the same disease, with exactly what we know about it today, I think we would land midway between what Sweden did and what the rest of the world did," Swedish state epidemiologist Anders Tegnell told Swedish Radio on Wednesday. Tegnell, a gruff, self-confident scientist with a mop of gray hair and an ever-present paper coffee cup in his hand, has turned into an object of fascination both inside Sweden and abroad with his iconoclastic approach to the crisis. He shot down other countries' attempts to close down their societies as a needless overreaction. He was so dismissive of Italy that he twice drew reprimands from the Italian ambassador in Stockholm. He reported to...
World outrage grows at Floyd's death; EU 'shocked, appalled'BRUSSELS (AP) - From Sydney to Paris, world outrage at George Floyd's death in the U.S. was growing Tuesday as the European Union's top diplomat said the bloc was "shocked and appalled" by it and thousands marched in Australia's largest city. Chanting "Black Lives Matter" and "I can't breathe," about 3,000 protesters held an impassioned but peaceful march through central Sydney on Tuesday demanding fundamental change in race relations. In France, protests were planned for the evening in Paris and across the country after calls from the family of a French black man who died shortly after he was arrested by police in 2016. A protest was also planned in The Hague, Netherlands. Floyd died last week after he was pinned to the pavement by a white police officer in Minneapolis who put his knee on the handcuffed black man's neck until he stopped breathing. His death set off protests that spread across America. EU foreign policy chief Josep Borrell's remarks in Brussels were the strongest so far to come out of the 27-nation bloc, saying Floyd's death was a result of an abuse of power. Borrell told reporters that "like the people of the United States, we are shocked and appalled by the death of George Floyd." He underlined that Europeans "support the right to peaceful protest, and also we condemn violence and racism of any kind, and for sure, we call for a de-escalation of tensions." Protesters around the world have expressed solidarity with Americans demonstrating against Floyd's death. In Sydney, a mostly Australian crowd, but also including protesters from the U.S. and elsewhere, marched for around a half-mile under police escort in the authorized, two-hour long demonstration. Many said they had been inspired by a mixture of sympathy for African...