Chris Dufresne, heralded college football writer, dies at 62LOS ANGELES (AP) - Chris Dufresne, an award-winning former sports writer for the Los Angeles Times, has died. He was 62. He died suddenly Monday while dining with his family at home in Chino Hills, 30 miles east of Los Angeles, according to a Times staff memo posted Tuesday on Facebook. "Chris had been awaiting the results for what appeared to be a late-stage melanoma recurrence," the memo said. Dufresne got a job working on the loading docks at the Times after graduating high school in 1976. His father worked in the newspaper's transportation department for 37 years. In 1981, he became a clerk covering high school sports at the Times' Orange County bureau. Dufresne continued rising at the paper, serving as national college football and basketball columnist from 1995-2015, when he accepted a buyout and left. In 2011, he was selected California Sportswriter of the Year by the National Sportscasters and Sportswriters Association. "He was a good guy and had a national reputation as being an exceptional college football writer," said John Nadel, a retired Associated Press sports writer who worked many of the same games with Dufresne over the years. In 2016, Dufresne co-founded TMGCollegeSports.com, teaming with other former newspaper sports writers Tony Barnhart, Mark Blaudschun and Herb Gould on the subscription website dedicated to college football. "College football probably is the only thing I'm attached to as a writer," Dufresne told Poynter.org. "I love it because it is all interconnected with every aspect of society and life. Everyone went to a school somewhere. There's nothing else like it." Born in Fullerton, Dufresne grew up in La Habra and graduated from Cal State Fullerton in 1981 with a degree in journalism. He is survived by wife...
Ex-Hoya, ex-Knick, current Georgetown coach Ewing has COVIDWASHINGTON (AP) - Georgetown basketball coach Patrick Ewing tested positive for COVID-19 and is being treated at a hospital. "This virus is serious and should not be taken lightly," the Hall of Famer as a player for the Hoyas in college and the New York Knicks in the NBA said in a statement issued by the university. "I want to encourage everyone to stay safe and take care of yourselves and your loved ones. Now more than ever, I want to thank the healthcare workers and everyone on the front lines. I'll be fine and we will all get through this." The school said the 57-year-old Ewing is the only member of its men's program who has contracted the coronavirus. As a player, the 7-foot Ewing helped Georgetown win the 1984 NCAA men's basketball championship and reach two other title games. During Ewing's four years playing for John Thompson Jr., Georgetown went 121-23, a winning percentage of .840. He was taken with the No. 1 overall pick in the 1985 draft after the Knicks won the NBA's first lottery. Ewing wound up leading New York to the 1994 NBA Finals, where they lost to Hakeem Olajuwon and the Houston Rockets. Ewing played 17 seasons in the NBA, 15 with the Knicks. After retiring as a player, he spent 15 years as an assistant or associate coach with four teams in the pros. In April 2017, he returned to Georgetown for his first job as a head coach at any level, replacing Thompson's son in that job with the Hoyas. In his first three seasons at his alma mater, Ewing's teams have gone a combined 49-46 with zero trips to the NCAA Tournament. In 2019-20, Georgetown finished the season with seven consecutive losses and a 15-17 record. Last week, sophomore guard Mac McClung announced that he was planning to enter the NCAA transfer portal, joining four...