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The right way to play MonopolyHow do you win Monopoly? And how do you keep it fun at the same time? Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Is there a right way to play Monopoly? Brian Valentine takes a stab at the answer — he was the United States representative to the 2015 World Monopoly championships, where he earned a third-place finish. As the above video shows, playing Monopoly right involves learning the rules all over again, processing key strategies, and, above all, valuing the people you play it with. Valentine shares his knowledge about probability heat maps that show the likelihood of landing on a certain space, nuances of gameplay around houses and hotels, and even a few tips on making games fun instead of rancorous. Further reading There are tons of articles that break down the math of Monopoly. While it’s not the only ingredient to playing Monopoly right, it’s an important one. This Business Insider article by Walt Hickey is a great primer, and this Thrillist article by Daisy Barringer gives you even more tips. https://www.businessinsider.com/math-monopoly-statistics-2013-6 https://www.thrillist.com/entertainment/nation/how-to-win-at-monopoly-every-time-according-to-experts If you really want to go deep on Monopoly championships, check out the Fandom history, including Valentine’s appearance in 2015. https://monopoly-championship-history.fandom.com/wiki/MONOPOLY_Championship_History_Wiki Most top Monopoly players follow in the footsteps of Philip Orbanes, who’s written a few Monopoly books, including this guide. His general board game history book, The Game Makers, is a fun read (but not really about gameplay strategy). https://books.google.com/books/about/The_Monopoly_Companion.html?id=x42RxZP8VyMC https://books.google.com/books/about/The_Game_Makers.html?id=pxPgwAEACAAJ Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Woods, Brady win a TV charity match as good as real thingTom Brady delivered the shot of the match that made it easy to forget the rest of his swings. Tiger Woods didn't miss a fairway and earned a small measure of revenge against Phil Mickelson. The PGA Tour is set to return in just over two weeks, and it has a tough act to follow. In the second and final charity match that brought live golf to TV, this exhibition was as entertaining as the real thing. Woods lagged a long birdie putt close enough that his partner, Peyton Manning, didn't have to putt. That secured a 1-up victory over Mickelson and Brady in "The Match: Champions for Charity." The goal was to raise $10 million or more for COVID-19 relief funds, and online donations sent money climbing toward about twice that much. This made-for-TV exhibition would have have worth pay-per-view, the model Woods and Mickelson used for a $9 million winner-take-all match in Las Vegas over Thanksgiving weekend in 2018 that Mickelson won in a playoff under lights. It felt forced, lacked banter and turned out to free because of technical issues. Throw in two NFL greats in Brady and Manning, and this allowed viewers to ride along for 18 holes at Medalist Golf Club among four of the biggest stars in sport. Justin Thomas pitched in as an on-course reporter, bringing a mixture of humor and insight with the right amount of words. Woods and Manning took the lead on the third hole and never trailed, building a 3-up lead in fourballs on the front nine, with Manning making two birdies (one was a net birdie). Brady, whose six Super Bowl titles are more than any NFL quarterback in history, took a beating on social media and in the broadcast booth from Charles Barkley, who twice offered $50,000 of his own money toward charity if Brady just hit the green on a par 3. He missed so far right it...