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Some senior voters in Florida cast skeptical eye toward Trump's reelectionAllen Lehner was a Republican until Donald Trump became his party's nominee in 2016. The 74-year-old retiree says he could not bring himself to vote for someone who lied, belittled others, walked out on his bills and mistreated women - but he also could not bring himself to vote for Hillary Clinton. So he did not vote. Trump has done nothing since to entice Lehner back. Lehner, who now considers himself an independent, says he is frightened by the president's lack of leadership and maturity amid the nation's health and economic crisis. Several people in his gated community in Delray Beach, Florida, have gotten sick; at least one has died. He worries about his own health - he has an autoimmune disease - and also about his adult children, including a daughter who has gone back to work and a son whose pay has been cut. He plans to vote for Joe Biden in November. "Regardless of what they say about his senior moments, I think he would be good and take good care of the country," said Lehner, who owned furniture and fireplace-supply stores in central Pennsylvania before retiring to Florida. While Democrats have worried about Biden's struggles to excite younger voters, older voters who are upset with the president are poised to be potentially more influential in November, especially in swing states whose populations skew their way, such as Florida, Pennsylvania, Arizona, Michigan and Wisconsin. In Florida, more than 20% of those who voted in the 2016 election were over age 65, according to exit polls. In 2016, Trump won the Florida senior vote by a 17-point margin over Clinton, according to exit polls. The state ranks as one Trump must almost certainly win to ensure his victory, while Biden has other paths to the White House. Yet for months, Biden has been more popular than...