Under pressure, Harvard says it will reject US relief aidCAMBRIDGE, Mass. (AP) - Harvard University announced Wednesday it will turn down $8.7 million in federal coronavirus relief, a day after President Donald Trump excoriated the wealthy Ivy League school over taxpayer money it stood to receive. Similar action was taken at Stanford, Princeton and Yale universities, which said they too will reject millions of dollars in federal funding amid growing scrutiny of wealthy colleges. Officials at Harvard said the school still faces significant financial challenges due to the pandemic but will refuse the money over concerns that "intense focus by politicians" will undermine the relief program created by Congress. "While we understand any reallocation of these resources is a matter for the Department of Education, we hope that special consideration will be given to Massachusetts institutions that are struggling to serve their communities and meet the needs of their students through these difficult and challenging times," Harvard said in a statement. Trump later thanked Harvard and Stanford at a White House press conference, saying he was pleased the schools turned down the funding. "They stopped it," he said. "They're not accepting the money and that's great. So I want to thank Harvard. I want to thank Stanford." Congress is offering $14 billion to the nation's colleges and universities as part of a $2.2 trillion rescue package. Schools were allotted varying sums based on their size and the number of students they teach from poorer backgrounds. But Trump said Tuesday that Harvard "shouldn't be taking" its share because it has such deep financial reserves. It echoed concerns from other critics, including some alumni, who said Harvard doesn't need the money and can rely on its nearly $40 billion...