AP source: MLB rejects 114-game plan, tells union no counterNEW YORK (AP) - Major League Baseball rejected the players' offer for a 114-game regular season in the pandemic-delayed season with no additional salary cuts and told the union it did not plan to make a counterproposal, a person familiar with the negotiations told The Associated Press. The person spoke on condition of anonymity Wednesday because no statements were authorized. Players made their proposal Sunday, up from an 82-game regular season in management's offer last week. Opening day would be June 30 and the regular season would end Oct. 31, nearly five weeks after the Sept. 27 conclusion that MLB's proposal stuck to from the season's original schedule. MLB told the union it had no interest in extending the season into November, when it fears a second wave of the coronavirus could disrupt the postseason and jeopardize $787 million in broadcast revenue. MLB notified the union of the rejection in a letter sent by email Wednesday. While management has suggested it could play a short regular season of about 50 games with no more salary reductions, it has not formally proposed that concept. Teams and players hope to start the season in ballparks with no fans, and teams claim they would sustain huge losses if salaries are not cut more. The sides agreed to a deal March 26 in which players accepted prorated salaries in exchange for $170 million in advances and a guarantee that if the season is scrapped each player would get 2020 service time matching what the player accrued in 2019. That deal called for "good faith" negotiations over playing in empty stadiums or at neutral sites. The union has said no additional cuts are acceptable. MLB's proposal on May 26 would lower 2020 salaries from about $4 billion to approximately $1.2 billion, establishing a...
AP source: MLB players offer 114-game season, no more $ cutsNEW YORK (AP) - Major League Baseball players proposed a 114-game regular season Sunday, up from 82 in management's offer, but no additional pay cuts beyond the one they agreed to in March, a person familiar with the plan told The Associated Press. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because no details were announced. Opening day in the coronavirus-delayed season would be June 30 and the regular season would end Oct. 31, nearly five weeks after the Sept. 27 conclusion that MLB's proposal stuck to from the season's original schedule. The union offered scheduling flexibility to include more doubleheaders. Players, like MLB, would increase postseason teams from 10 to 14. While management proposed an expanded postseason for 2020 only, the union offered it for this year and next. A player would receive about about 70% of his salary under the union plan. MLB's offer Tuesday included a sliding scale in which those at the $563,500 minimum would get about 47% and those at the top - led by Mike Trout and Gerrit Cole at $36 million - would receive less than 23%. All players would have the right to opt out of the season under the union plan. Those who meet qualifications for high risk or reside with a person who qualifies as high risk would receive salary and major league service. Others who opt out would receive major league service time but no salary. If the postseason is not held because of a second wave of the pandemic, the union plan calls for $100 million of the approximately $2.8 billion in salary to be deferred with interest, payable in November 2021 and November 2022. Only players whose original 2020 salaries were $10 million or more would be subject to having money deferred. The union estimates high-payroll teams would have up to $7 million in payroll...
AP sources: Players want more games, no more salary cutsNEW YORK (AP) - Baseball players appeared likely to propose more regular-season games this year while holding to their demand for full prorated salaries, people familiar with their deliberations told The Associated Press. Washington pitcher Max Scherzer, among eight players on the union's executive subcommittee, issued a statement late Wednesday night calling management's proposal for more salary cuts a non-starter. A day after Major League Baseball proposed a sliding scale of salary slashing for a pandemic-delayed season with an 82-game schedule in ballparks without fans, the union held a conference call Wednesday that included its executive board, player representatives and alternate player representatives, the people said. They spoke on condition of anonymity because no details were announced. Scherzer, among the sport's highest-paid players, confirmed the call without divulging who was on it. "After discussing the latest developments with the rest of the players there's no need to engage with MLB in any further compensation reductions," he said in a statement posted to Twitter. "We have previously negotiated a pay cut in the version of prorated salaries, and there's no justification to accept a 2nd pay cut based upon the current information the union has received." "I'm glad to hear other players voicing the same viewpoint," he added, "and believe MLB's economic strategy would completely change if all documentation were to become public information." It was unclear when the union will respond to MLB's plan, the people said. Stars Mike Trout and Gerrit Cole would lose the most under MLB's plan, about 77% of the $36 million each they were set to be paid this season. In all, there are 133 players whose contracts call for salaries of $10 million or...