Mix doesn't support your web browser. For a better experience, we recommend using another browser.
Ex-Stanford two-sport star Zach Hoffpauir dies at 26Zach Hoffpauir, a two-sport standout at Stanford who earned All-Pac 12 honors as a safety in football and played two seasons in the Arizona Diamondbacks' minor league system, has died at age 26. The University of Northern Colorado, where Hoffpauir was hired in February as an assistant football coach in charge of the safeties, said Hoffpauir died in his sleep Thursday. The school provided no further details. "I am devastated by the loss of Zach Hoffpauir, a friend to me and my family since his playing days with my son Christian at Stanford," Bears new head football coach Ed McCaffrey wrote on Instagram on Friday. "He was like a brother to our boys and recently found his calling as our safeties coach at Northern Colorado. He was a young, intelligent coach with limitless potential." Hoffpauir, who was from Glendale, Arizona, was close friends with McCaffrey's son, Christian, who's now an All-Pro running back for the Carolina Panthers, when they both attended Stanford. C hristian McCaffrey posted a photo of Hoffpauir on his Instagram account Friday which began, "Yesterday Heaven gained an angel, and I lost one of my best friends in the world." He called Hoffpauir "a true friend and great brother to anyone he knew. He was a walking example of how to care for people, a rare soul." Hoffpauir was a safety for four seasons on the Cardinal football team, winning three Pac-12 titles and two Rose Bowls. He also starred as an outfielder on Stanford's baseball team and was drafted by the Diamondbacks in 2015. Hoffpauir played two seasons of minor league ball, in 2015 and 2018, hitting .224 with three homers and nine RBIs in 107 at-bats in rookie and Class-A ball. At Stanford, his three-year totals were 11 homers, 58 RBIs and a career .295 batting average.
'Last Dance' Episode 8 recap: Jordan punched Steve Kerr right in the eyeEpisodes 7 and 8 of "The Last Dance" function in tandem: An exhausted Michael Jordan retires in the former, only to return with renewed vigor and ferocity in the latter. Perhaps anticipating some viewers might be suffering from idol-worship fatigue, the documentary told the story of the record-setting 72-win 1995-96 Chicago Bulls through the dark, demanding lens of life as one of Jordan's teammates. Jordan entered the season still smarting from his loss to the Orlando Magic in the 1995 playoffs. That series, which unfolded a few months after his midseason return from minor league baseball, was his first playoff defeat since the 1990 Eastern Conference finals against the Detroit Pistons. To add insult, Orlando's Nick Anderson told reporters that "Number 45 is not Number 23" - a reference to Jordan's brief post-retirement jersey number switch. Jordan spent the summer of 1995 on the set of "Space Jam" in Los Angeles, where the 32-year-old hosted star-studded pickup games and worked his body back into peak basketball shape. Once training camp rolled around, Jordan was 27 months removed from his most recent title celebration, and Scottie Pippen was the only other Bulls player remaining from the three-peat. Those conditions compelled Jordan to treat his new teammates like first-year cadets. "I wanted them to understand what it felt like to be in the trenches," he explained. "If you don't understand, then you're not going to respond when the war starts. Steve [Kerr] and Luc [Longley], all those guys, they come in riding high on the three championships and they had no f---ing thing to do with it. We were s--- when I got [to the Bulls in 1984]. We elevated to be a championship-quality team. There were certain standards we had to live by. You don't come pussyfooting around, joking and kidding around. You have to come in ready...
'Last Dance' Episode 7 recap: Retirement meant freedom for JordanEpisode 7 of "The Last Dance" will go down as the documentary's most memorable hour because it explored in detail two earth-shattering events that shaped Michael Jordan's career and life: the murder of his father in July 1993 and his first retirement from basketball three months later. During his 17-month break from the NBA that followed, Jordan played minor league baseball, rekindled his love of hoops and honed his philosophy of competition that would drive the Chicago Bulls' second three-peat. Jordan was and is a masterful communicator, but he has never cared much for public introspection. Through six episodes, his most illuminating interviews concerned his rivalry with Isiah Thomas and his vendetta against Bulls General Manager Jerry Krause. He came up largely empty on the subject of politics, and his family life - including his 1989 marriage to Juanita, his first wife, and the births of his first three children - has been ignored. Jordan is far more interested in exploiting his opponent's weaknesses than revealing his own. Yet the "Crying Jordan" meme exists for a reason: When Jordan has shown emotion, such as during his eulogy to former Los Angeles Lakers star Kobe Bryant, the floodgates have opened all the way. Here, the subject of James Jordan, whose affection Jordan sought throughout his childhood, brought the Hall of Famer nearly to tears. James Jordan's murder, which authorities concluded was part of a robbery, shocked the family. One minute, it thought the patriarch was playing golf in Hilton Head, South Carolina. The next, he was missing - and his red Lexus was found without him. His body was eventually discovered in a creek. He had been shot once, and two teenagers were charged with murder and robbery. Father and son were especially close. James Jordan attended many Bulls games and was a regular...