Annie Glenn, 100, famed astronaut's widow, dies of COVID-19COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) - Annie Glenn, wife of the late astronaut and U.S. Sen. John Glenn who overcame a childhood stutter to become an advocate for others with speech disorders, died Tuesday of complications from COVID-19. She was 100. Glenn died at a nursing home near St. Paul, Minnesota, where she'd moved in recent years to be near her daughter, said Hank Wilson, a spokesman for the Glenn College of Public Affairs at The Ohio State University. NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine also announced Glenn's death, the latest among centenarians succumbing rapidly to the new coronavirus. John Glenn died in 2016 following an extraordinary career that included breaking the transcontinental speed record, becoming the first American to orbit Earth and serving as a Democratic U.S. senator from Ohio. At the time of his death, he and Annie had been married 73 years. The relationship was "the stuff of fairy tales and one of the great love stories of all time," Dale Butland, the senator's former speechwriter and chief of staff, said in a statement Tuesday. "During WW II, the Korean war and two flights into outer space, Annie patiently waited for her John to come home," Butland said. "Since December of 2016, John's been patiently waiting for his Annie. Today, they're both where they always wanted to be: together - for all eternity." Annie Glenn was thrust into the spotlight in 1962, when her husband made his famous space flight. She shied away from the media attention because of a severe stutter. Later, she underwent an intensive program at the Communications Research Institute at Hollins College, now Hollins University, in Roanoke, Virginia, that gave her the skills to control her stutter and to speak in public. By the time 77-year-old John Glenn returned to space...
Ishmael Beah's Story: From Child Soldier to Human Rights Activist | UNICEF USAEvery time you save a child from war, there is hope. From child soldier to renowned author and human rights activist, the gripping story of Ishmael Beah, a UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador, sounds like a novel. No wonder that it later became an inspirational, bestselling book. UNICEF played a critical role in transforming his life and bringing hope. Born out of the rubble of WW II, UNICEF has promoted children’s rights and has a presence in over 190 countries and territories, helping to save more children’s lives than any other humanitarian organization. However dire the circumstances, UNICEF has always stood for hope, because we know that — with commitment over time — we can accomplish real progress for the world's children. Investing in our children means a brighter future for all. Find out more: https://www.unicefusa.org Please share this page on your social networks to support UNICEF in helping children in need around the world. Make a difference in a child’s life with a tax deductible donation: https://www.unicefusa.org/help/donate UNICEF would not be able to provide support to children in need without donations from people like you. Help UNICEF save lives and donate to UNICEF here: https://www.unicefusa.org/ Stay updated on UNICEF’s humanitarian efforts! Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/UNICEF-USA Twitter: https://twitter.com/unicefusa Instagram: http://instagram.com/UNICEFUSA Google+: https://plus.google.com/+UNICEFUSA Category Nonprofits & Activism License Standard YouTube License Category Nonprofits & Activism License Standard YouTube License