disCONNECT / Alex Fakso / Between The Collective And The Individual.The marauding crowd, faceless and multi-podel, rumbling with half ideas and mislead missions. If you have lived in cities you know the feeling of being swept along inside one as it hurtles down the stairs, up the escalator, through the lobby, across various stadia. Alex Fakso. Schoeni Projects / HK Walls. London. (photo © Ian Cox) We like it because we feel like we are part of something bigger, something that must have a logic of its own. In losing yourself, in becoming one with these others, we are reassured for that moment that there is something larger and of consequence, if only to break apart again into one once more. Alex Fakso. Schoeni Projects / HK Walls. London. (photo © Ian Cox) Isolation and pandemic have scarred many minds in the last few months because they’ve been couple with fear, but these events have opened a few minds as well because we’ve had time to examine, correlate, critique, observe our own impulses and needs and wants. Artist Alex Fakso tells us that he used to be an avid traveler for his work, relying perhaps on incessant movement for his sanity - moving from city to city sort of mindlessly. He says he may have taken some things and people for granted, including himself. and the current world crisis has allowed him to reflect on what was left for granted by many people including himself. Alex Fakso. Schoeni Projects / HK Walls. London. (photo © Ian Cox) In his installation for the disconnect exhibition in London, he says these ideas of panic and isolation are at the core. A distanced exhibit, he’ll be happy to see you contemplate the images of crowds placed here. He hopes it will be “a dive into a world which has dramatically changed,” he says, and one in which, “as individuals, we currently long to belong again.” Click here for the details on disCONNECT Alex Fakso. Schoeni Projects / HK Walls. London. (photo © Ian Cox) Participating artists: Adam Neate (UK)Aida Wilde (Iran)Alex Fakso (Italy) Mr.Cenz (UK) David Bray (UK) Herakut (Germany) Icy and Sot (Iran) Isaac Cordal (Spain) Vhils (Portugal) ZOER (Italy) Alex Fakso. Schoeni Projects / HK Walls. London. (photo © Ian Cox) Alex Fakso. The Couple. Photo on vinyl on old reclaimed photos. Schoeni Projects / HK Walls. London. (photo © Ian Cox)
Lady Pink Blossoms in Welling Court Mural Project NYC – 2020Free spirit Lady Pink has sprinkled a summer bouquet across a wall here with friends in Queens for the Welling Court Mural Project this year. The Ecuadorian-American artist is known by many for her graffiti writing on trains in the 1970s and 1980s and her latter day murals empowering women, exploring the cityscape - and themes of rebellion or self-expression. Lady Pink. Welling Court Mural Project NYC - June 2020 (photo © Jaime Rojo) Here she has decided to keep it simple for summer 2020, perhaps in the face of the complexity of our lives at the moment. These colors and motifs of flora are reassuring and soothing – possibly to give a salve for our collective wounds as she subtly pays tribute to those names of black and brown people brutalized by our system. The city is hurting, black people are hurting, poor folks are hurting. In times like these, Lady Pink and her painting family know what you need, because they need it too. Lady Pink. Welling Court Mural Project NYC - June 2020 (photo © Jaime Rojo) Shout out to Alison Wallis for organizing this years Welling Court Mural Project, despite the challenges of Covid-19. Read more about the project at wellingcourtmuralprojectnyc on Instagram. Lady Pink. Welling Court Mural Project NYC - June 2020 (photo © Jaime Rojo) Lady Pink. Welling Court Mural Project NYC - June 2020 (photo © Jaime Rojo) Lady Pink. Welling Court Mural Project NYC - June 2020 (photo © Jaime Rojo) Lady Pink. Welling Court Mural Project NYC - June 2020 (photo © Jaime Rojo) Lady Pink. Welling Court Mural Project NYC - June 2020 (photo © Jaime Rojo) Lady Pink. Welling Court Mural Project NYC - June 2020 (photo © Jaime Rojo) Lady Pink. Welling Court Mural Project NYC - June 2020 (photo © Jaime Rojo) Lady Pink with the crew. Welling Court Mural Project NYC - June 2020 (photo © Martha Cooper) Lady Pink. Welling Court Mural Project NYC - June 2020 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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Dave The Chimp @ Urban Nation Berlin: Love Is Fuel.When Jan Sauerwald, Urban Nation's Artistic Director began making plans in earnest for the new facade for the museum, he was pondering what the art on the walls should convey. Given the difficult Covid-inflicted times we are living he thought that possibly something fun and humorous was what Berlin needed. Indeed, humor has the power to provide levity, but humor is also an exceptionally effective vehicle to impart knowledge and spread a positive message without appearing to be lecturing. So it seemed most appropriate to gift the denizens of Berlin a fresh, humorous new mural, especially considering that collectively the whole city had just endured months of lockdown, and they are just now slowly coming out to play outdoors and drink some beers with friends in the paks. Luckily he knew who to call. Dave The Chimp. A Berlin-based artist, illustrator, and skateboarder who is known on the streets of Berlin for his simple but street-smart orange characters shaped like a bean. He calls them Human Beans We reached out to Dave The Chimp and asked him a few questions about the artists he invited to paint along with him and about his experience being able to get up and to get dirty again on the streets. Dave The Chimp. Urban Nation Museum. Berlin, Germany. June 2020 (photo © Urban Nation by Nika Kramer) BSA: How did it feel to get up after the lockdown? How was the experience of working outdoors for the first time in many weeks? DtC: I don’t work outside often. My work practice is constantly changing, sometimes painting, sometimes drawing comics or creating skateboard graphics, writing the text for zines, and in the past, I’ve organized costumed wrestling parties, played in a punk band, directed pop videos and tv commercials, compiled books… painting outside is just one of a constantly changing set of fun problems to solve! I personally enjoyed the lockdown. I started meditating again, I was stretching and doing yoga and working out almost every day. Sitting on my balcony in the April sun, reading, catching up on all the movies I don’t have time to watch, helping plug the gaps in my son's education, trying new recipes. All my projects and exhibitions were canceled so I figured “ok, guess I’m on holiday for a few months, so let’s forget about work”. I realized that this was a very unusual time, so why would I try and carry on with my usual life? Germany locked-down early. Berlin was quick to organize an emergency fund for freelance workers, so most were able to receive money that meant they could survive a few months without worry. This lessened the fear. Fear shuts down the immune system, and during a pandemic, the one thing you need is a strong immune system! It was great to come out of the lockdown here and be straight on a worksite, mingling with people, getting dirty, laying in the street. After two months of washing my hands constantly, it was fascinating to feel just how grimy I get just living a normal life! We’re a bunch of filthy little monkeys! Dave The Chimp, Mina, Señor Schnu, Matt Jones, and Humble Writerz. Urban Nation Museum. Berlin, Germany. June 2020 (photo © Urban Nation by Nika Kramer) BSA: UN invited you to paint the UN facade for the first time. In turn, you invited four artists to join you. What were your criteria for inviting the other artists? DtC: Due to Corona, the new museum exhibition had to be delayed until September. They had planned to paint the facade for this exhibition with other artists, so had the city permit to put the lift in the street at the end of May. The crisis has meant that all government offices are running slowly, and a new permit wouldn’t be possible until early 2021. Jan called me and asked me if I could paint the facade two weeks before work had to begin! The first idea was for me to paint it with Flying Fortress, but unfortunately, he wasn’t available. This sowed the idea of working with others in my mind and I figured “if it would have been fun painting with one friend, why don’t I invite four?” I chose people I like, and whose work I like, and that I could see working with the theme I wanted to portray on the wall. Originally I had a team of two boys and two girls, but one of the girls wasn’t available, and I couldn’t find another making the kind of thing I needed. Luckily my friend Matt Jones had recently sent me a zine of his doodles, and I saw how some of these could work as a kind of ancient alien language etched into my Stone Henge “stargate”. I invited Mina to paint her powerful females as prehistoric rock paintings, got my skateboard buddy Humble Writerz to chisel the faces he bombs in the streets into stone columns, and had Señor Schnu paste his posters onto boulders. And then I added my own characters so it looked like they were doing all of this work! ;-) Dave The Chimp. Urban Nation Museum. Berlin, Germany. June 2020 (photo © Urban Nation by Nika Kramer) BSA: The mural has a playful tone to it which goes well with your character but it also has a message of a team effort in order to build a better world. Is that right? DtC: I’m pretty sure we don’t need to use fear and anger to change the world. As PiL said, anger is an energy, but I’ve learned that it’s one that is soon burnt out. Much better to try and make the world a better place with love as your fuel. There’s an endless supply of love in all of us. Political action doesn’t need to always be a raised fist, a black, red, and white stenciled shout at the world. Why can’t protests be a fun day out, just like a festival, a carnival of change? BSA: Can you tell us about the genesis of the concept for the mural? Did you have a brainstorming session with the other artists or did you know what you wanted and just told them your idea and they jumped into action? DtC: I pretty much see complete ideas in my head. I knew I wanted to paint rocks, and I knew the work of the artists I wanted to paint with. And I had a week to work out the design of an 8 meter high by 50-meter long wall, with three doors, six windows, various corners, and parts inaccessible by the lift! I didn’t have time for brainstorming! I came up with concepts, told the artists what it was I’d like them to do, and then trusted them to do their thing. I had way too many things to think about - five artists with different schedules, a lift that took 20 minutes to move each time, and three days when we were not allowed to use the lift, created an organizational nightmare! Plus I had to try and paint huge structures that I’d never painted before, and 25 characters, all doing different things. But that’s kinda what I like. Painting is setting myself problems, then trying to solve them. It’s fun! If I know what I’m doing, how exactly to do something, and how it will turn out, in advance, then it just becomes work. Better to keep yourself on your toes, make it play! Dave The Chimp. Urban Nation Museum. Berlin, Germany. June 2020 (photo © Urban Nation by Nika Kramer) BSA: Where do you see public murals/outdoor murals going after Covid-19 and the worldwide protests about racial injustice, racism, and police brutality? DtC: I’ve always thought of graffiti and street art as a political act. It is a reclaiming of the commons. In our cities only those with the money to buy the walls around us - public space - get to have a voice. Advertising is designed to make you require more, to feel like what you have, who you are, is not enough. This is psychological oppression and we are exposed to it thousands of times a day. If we can use walls to make people feel less than, can’t we also use them to feel greater than, to inspire, to cheer, or just simply to help people be satisfied that they are ok? Like Picasso, I believe art can be a weapon to wage war. Bad people win when good people stay silent. I have been known to make political work and to use a lot of slogans and messages in my work, but right now, in 2020, I find that I am overwhelmed with things that need to be spoken about, with things that are being spoken about, and, frankly, I don’t feel able to speak. Things are changing so quickly. It’s all too confusing. So I am trying to keep my use of words to a minimum, and to try and communicate on a more subtle level. The rocks in this mural represent our belief in the human-built structures and systems of life. The scaffolding, the planks and ropes, represent just how fragile all these systems are, as we have been seeing, and show our need to work together to make life function. A mural like this couldn’t have been made without a huge network of people. The group of artists I worked with, the production crew at YAP, the lift hire guys, the factory workers that made the brushes, the chemists who brewed the paint, the people that built the wall, the people that cooked our lunch, the people that farmed the food for our lunch, the people that made the bikes we rode to the site every day, that built the roads we rode on… thousands of people are involved in every single human action. The world is a crazy place right now, and it’s important to remember that we’re all in this together. Maybe it’s better we stop finding ways to divide ourselves, and instead unite. Together we are stronger. Dave the Chimp. Berlin, Germany, June 2020 Dave The Chimp. Mina at work. Urban Nation Museum. Berlin, Germany. June 2020 (photo © Urban Nation by Nika Kramer) Dave The Chimp. Matt Jones at work. Urban Nation Museum. Berlin, Germany. June 2020 (photo © Urban Nation by Nika Kramer) Dave The Chimp. Humble Writerz. Urban Nation Museum. Berlin, Germany. June 2020 (photo © Urban Nation by Nika Kramer) Dave The Chimp. Mina. Urban Nation Museum. Berlin, Germany. June 2020 (photo © Urban Nation by Nika Kramer) Dave The Chimp. Señor Schnu. Matt Jones. Detail, Urban Nation Museum. Berlin, Germany. June 2020 (photo © Urban Nation by Nika Kramer) Dave The Chimp. Señor Schnu. Matt Jones, Mina. Detail.Urban Nation Museum. Berlin, Germany. June 2020 (photo © Urban Nation by Nika Kramer) Dave The Chimp. Señor Schnu. Matt Jones, Mina. Urban Nation Museum. Berlin, Germany. June 2020 (photo © Urban Nation by Nika Kramer) Dave The Chimp. Señor Schnu. Matt Jones, Mina. Urban Nation Museum. Berlin, Germany. June 2020 (photo © Urban Nation by Nika Kramer)
disCONNECT / VHILS / A Red Door’s JourneydisCONNECT - a ‘locked-down’ artist takeover If you send your red painted door to Vhils in Lisbon you KNOW that you’ll be thrilled to see it come back! Doors removed from the library to be shipped to Vhils's studio in Lisbon. (photo © Schoeni Projects) The folks organizing the disCONNECT exhibition in this Victorian townhouse in South West London can confirm that this sensation of anticipation and discovery is exciting indeed, for anyone who has been watching the street artists' work over the last decade. Vhils. Studio, Lisbon, Portugal (photo © Alexander Silva) Named disConnect because of our communal feeling of disconnection during quarantine these last few months, the unconventional art exhibition is breaking some new ground. Pulling the doors off the hinges in the library and popping them in the mail is one. Vhils. Studio, Lisbon, Portugal (photo © Alexander Silva) The pandemic show opens in a few weeks with the bas-relief works re-installed for the socially distanced attendees who can see it in person. It is also “accessible to online audiences through Matterport software, (with) each work further activated through an accompanying programme of digital initiatives, including downloadable artworks, online videos, virtual tours and an Instagram Live interview series.” Vhils. Studio, Lisbon, Portugal (photo © Alexander Silva) Vhils. Doors arrive in London. (photo © Ian Cox) Vhils. Schoeni Projects / HK Walls. London. (photo © Ian Cox) Vhils. Schoeni Projects / HK Walls. London. (photo © Ian Cox) Vhils. Schoeni Projects / HK Walls. London. (photo © Ian Cox) Participating artists: Adam Neate (UK)Aida Wilde (Iran)Alex Fakso (Italy) Mr.Cenz (UK) David Bray (UK) Herakut (Germany) Icy and Sot (Iran) Isaac Cordal (Spain) Vhils (Portugal) ZOER (Italy) We’re thankful to show you these exclusive images of the new Vhils work to BSA readers today. Click Here to Learn More and Participate in disCONNECT Wall Of Fame. Deadline extended until July 12
BSA Images Of The Week; 06.28.20Welcome to BSA Images of the Week and Happy Pride NYC. No pride parade today, not that New York needs a special day for LGBTQI parades - that's simply called walking on the catwalk, err, sidewalk. The US is officially a pariah on the world stage - banned to travel to Europe. Because, you know, masks. But dude, we're like in totally good company with other countries like Brazil and Russia. It's a race to be number 1. A special shout-out and respect today goes to the creater of the I (heart) NY logo and campaign, Milton Glaser, who passed away this week at 91. Many artists on the street today are aware of his other contributions to graphic design and illustration in the last fifty years or so. Rest in Peace. In street art news, downtown Manhattan is still largely boarded up, so artists are taking advantage of the new canvasses. You see, there is a silver lining to everything if you look for it. Or a plywood one. Here’s our weekly interview with the streets, this week featuring Daze, DPF Studio, Dragon 77, Hek Tad, Sara Lynne Leo, and Stikman. Hek Tad says Trans Lives Matter. June is Pride Month in the USA. Today we would have been on the streets, jubilant for the rights that the LGBT community has been able to achieve in the last two decades. Covid-19 will prevent us from marching and celebrating on the streets as in years past. We understand that. There are myriad other ways to feel jubilant for what we have, to honor those who have died so we can enjoy freedom, Larry Kramer who at age 84 just died in May was such a man. Fearless, intelligent, eloquent, passionate, and true to his beliefs; never flinched and never compromised in his quest to make certain that we were treated equally even in the era of AIDS when gays were further stigmatized by a public health hysteria. The Supreme Court last week ruled that the Civil Rights Law of 1964 protects us from workplace discrimination based on our sexual orientation or gender identity. This was a historic ruling we all were waiting for. We celebrate this victory today. (photo © Jaime Rojo) Hek Tad (photo © Jaime Rojo) Sara Lynne-Leo (photo © Jaime Rojo) Sara Lynne-Leo (photo © Jaime Rojo) Sara Lynne-Leo (photo © Jaime Rojo) Stikman (photo © Jaime Rojo) DPF Studio (photo © Jaime Rojo) DPF Studio (photo © Jaime Rojo) DPF Studio (photo © Jaime Rojo) DPF Studio (photo © Jaime Rojo) DPF Studio (photo © Jaime Rojo) Dragon76 (photo © Jaime Rojo) Nick C Kirk (photo © Jaime Rojo) Nick C Kirk (photo © Jaime Rojo) Daze and Server. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo) Daze and Server. (photo © Jaime Rojo) David Hollier (photo © Jaime Rojo) Amir Diop99 (photo © Jaime Rojo) Haculla. (photo © Jaime Rojo) Untitled. The Bronx. June 2020 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Seniors Getting Up in Belgrade Add to a Parade of “Granny Graffiti”The demographic contrast is colossal between the stereotype of your grandparents and the archetype of a delinquent hooded graffiti writer who bombs the margins of the nighttime metropolis. Seniors Workshop organized by Street Art Belgrade and Božidarac. Belgrade, June 2020 (photo © Nemanja Stojanović) The mental image of seniors wielding spraycans in public is also a reliable feel-good community story that TV news producers devour like frosted donuts and one that makes you feel like everything is all right with the world after all. Yes, Covid-19 looks like it is killing off half the country, but just take a few minutes to watch Mildred maneuvering that Montana Gold with two hands to spray a portrait of her cat on the wall! Is there any doubt that all is well and everything is going to be fine after all? Seniors Workshop organized by Street Art Belgrade and Božidarac. Belgrade, June 2020 (photo © Nemanja Stojanović) Truth be told, we’ve met a significant number of old-skool New York train graffiti writers who are in their 60s and 70s and who still occasionally catch a tag when no one is looking, so perhaps our stereotypes of seniors need adjustment. Not to mention seniors like one of New York’s most prolific street artists, the octogenarian Robert Janz, and Jacques Villeglé, the French nonagenarian who originated a style of on-the-street Paris poster laceration that pre-dated by decades many street artists who followed. But as an ‘event’ seniors with spraycans have been going since at least the early 2010s in Portugal and Germany where a white-haired 70 year old became famous as a one-woman anti-nazi graffiti crusader. Seniors Workshop organized by Street Art Belgrade and Božidarac. Belgrade, June 2020 (photo © Nemanja Stojanović) In the last few years the senior sprayers idea continues to expand and become a little more commercial; An enterprising Denver art gallery drummed up goodwill with its version of graffiti grannies and even the Nuart Festival brand offered an inspiring senior spray program to their clients in Aberdeen to round out the street art package for a wider audience last year. Of course if you are a black New York senior who is writing an Anti-Trump message in chalk on a wall, you’ll be fingerprinted and given a mugshot. Here in Belgrade, spirits have been lifted by this month by what organizers at Street Art Belgrade and Paint Kartel characterize as the “first ever ‘Street art workshop for seniors”. They say that the goal of this new program in the Serbian capital is “to inspire and provide practical knowledge to participants over the age of 60, as a way of support for understanding street art and further creative expression,” they say in their press release. Seniors Workshop organized by Street Art Belgrade and Božidarac. Belgrade, June 2020 (photo © Nemanja Stojanović) Indeed, many of the images feature people of different generations working together. “Through this workshop, the older generations connected with the younger ones in a unique way and challenged the stereotype that street art is only for ‘young people’. Seniors Workshop organized by Street Art Belgrade and Božidarac. Belgrade, June 2020 (photo © Nemanja Stojanović) At a time when (primarily) young people have been in the streets around the world vociferating about racism and other issues surrounding equality, maybe more of our conversations about intersectionality are going to include our seniors as well. Most would agree that any program that fosters greater mutual respect is a positive step forward. You may also feel a note of optimism to see stereotypes of graffiti writers, muralists, and street artists evolving; artists from the Serbian Paint Kartel crew served these seniors as creative mentors throughout the workshop. Seniors Workshop organized by Street Art Belgrade and Božidarac. Belgrade, June 2020 (photo © Nemanja Stojanović) Seniors Workshop organized by Street Art Belgrade and Božidarac. Belgrade, June 2020 (photo © Nemanja Stojanović) Seniors Workshop organized by Street Art Belgrade and Božidarac. Belgrade, June 2020 (photo © Nemanja Stojanović) Seniors Workshop organized by Street Art Belgrade and Božidarac. Belgrade, June 2020 (photo © Nemanja Stojanović)
Avant Garde Tudela 2020. Part III – Miss Van Brings Her LadiesMore hippy chic and free-wheeling than you may remember, Miss Van brings her buxom, plump, yet oddly drowsy beauties to the Avant Garde festival in Spain. Evermore stylized and romantic, her feathered and festooned ladies have always had a mysterious sensuality since you first began seeing them on the street over a decade ago. Now as their dandy evolution swoons them to something closer to hyperreal, we may be seeing a merging with aesthetics of AI and the smoothly moving robotics of today’s science realm. Miss Van. Avant Garde Tudela 2020. Tudela, Spain. June 2020. (photo © Fer Alcala) The raven-haired Toulousean street artist/muralist/painter brings here ‘Las Gitanas’ as the final of this three-chapter Tudela tome, a warmly languid femininity that washes over you, bringing you closer than you had imagined to the future. With June’s mulberry bruised skies above the rusted mountain range behind them, these pursed-lipped adventurers are given an added dimension of surreality from the photo-framing by gifted photographer Fer Alcala in these shots for Avant Garde Tudela 2020. Miss Van. Avant Garde Tudela 2020. Tudela, Spain. June 2020. (photo © Fer Alcala) Miss Van. Avant Garde Tudela 2020. Tudela, Spain. June 2020. (photo © Fer Alcala) Miss Van. Avant Garde Tudela 2020. Tudela, Spain. June 2020. (photo © Fer Alcala) Miss Van. Avant Garde Tudela 2020. Tudela, Spain. June 2020. (photo © Fer Alcala) Miss Van. Avant Garde Tudela 2020. Tudela, Spain. June 2020. (photo © Fer Alcala) Miss Van. Avant Garde Tudela 2020. Tudela, Spain. June 2020. (photo © Fer Alcala)
disCONNECT Wall Of Fame / Free Coloring BooksIn need a calming yet stimulating distraction during these tumultuous times? Artists from Schoeni Projects and HK Walls have made a free coloring book for you and so much more. Aida Wilde (photo © Jenny Lewis) They’re also mounting a show in a Victorian townhouse in South West London as part of an exhibition created during our Covid-19 lockdown and we’ll be bringing you exclusive installations from them. They’re calling it the disCONNECT Wall of Fame and it will run July 24 – August 24. And here’s a sweet spot: You can participate in the exhibition with your own work. Submissions of your complete own creation on your thoughts and feelings about the pandemic are welcomed; a quote, a poem, a drawing, a painting. Click here for all the details https://schoeniprojects.com/ Click here to learn all about it. Participating artists: Adam Neate (UK)Aida Wilde (Iran)Alex Fakso (Italy) Mr.Cenz (UK) David Bray (UK) Herakut (Germany) Icy and Sot (Iran) Isaac Cordal (Spain) Vhils (Portugal) ZOER (Italy) David Bray (photo courtesy of Schoeni Projects) An unusual approach to most unusual circumstances, this joint London/Hong Kong show will reflect on the creative and physical constraints of the current global crisis, exploring psychological and political reactions to the crisis, as well as the role of technology as conduit between the two. Accessible to online audiences through Matterport software, each work is further activated through an accompanying program of digital initiatives, including downloadable artworks, online videos, virtual tours and an Instagram Live interview series. Mr Cenz (photo courtesy of Schoeni Projects)
BSA Images Of The Week: 06.21.20Welcome to BSA Images of the Week and welcome to summer in NYC here on its 2nd day. Also Happy Father's Day in the US. Juneteenth. White Fragility. Defund the Police. How to Be an Antiracist. All of these new terms and phrases erupting on the main stage of the public lexicon today speak to a fundamental disgust with the system that's been in effect. As uncomfortable as it may be, our better selves know that the conversations and changes that have started are vitally necessary to have if we ever want to move forward as a society. Right now in New York people are marching, protesting, drinking on the street, setting off fireworks, and holding doors open for one another with a new sensitivity thanks to internal bruising. We also see people disregarding safety precautions in the spread of Covid-19, and honking their car horns more often. All of this is against a backdrop of Americans being unceremoniously slid into poverty and unheard of unemployment, with nary a mention in the national media and near silence from both national parties. It's good to know that the LGBTQ can't get fired for being LGBTQ, and children of undocumented immigrants born here will be protected under DACA. Unfortunately there are no jobs! But on the streets, the messages and the energy and the defiance and determination and the comedy are all there, running on the hot pavement. Here’s our weekly interview with the streets, this week featuring Almost Over Keep Smiling, Cash4, Chris Tuorto, C0rn Queen, Crisp, KAWS, Menacersa, Nico, Skewville, Smells, and Tag Street Art. Chris Tuorto #blacklivesmatter (photo © Jaime Rojo) #blacklivesmatter (photo © Jaime Rojo) #blacklivesmatter (photo © Jaime Rojo) #blacklivesmatter (photo © Jaime Rojo) #juneteenth (photo © Jaime Rojo) #TAG in Tel-Aviv. #blacklivesmatter (photo © Jaime Rojo) Mena-Ceresa. #blacklivesmatter (photo © Jaime Rojo) Almost Over Keep Smiling (photo © Jaime Rojo) CASH SMELLS (photo © Jaime Rojo) C0rn Queen (photo © Jaime Rojo) NICO (photo © Jaime Rojo) Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo) Crisp / Skewville (photo © Jaime Rojo) KAWS (photo © Jaime Rojo) Untitled. Williamsburg, Brooklyn. June 2020. (photo © Jaime Rojo) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c6C-dZPAmbg&list=PLFgquLnL59amNFWw5uqVGnRuCe0P80pcN
Pøbel + The Lovers + The Amazon + FundraiserNorwegian Street Artist Pøbel is offering artists proofs of his “The Lovers” print to raise funds for Covid-19 efforts in the Amazon. Today you have an opportunity to get an original and unique piece that has been featured on many publications since he first put this image of a couple in embrace on the streets. Pøbel Tne Lovers Detail. (photo courtesy of Pøbel) He tells us that he’s travelled many times to South America and has made friends with folks in indigenous communities. “Many of these are now suffering due to the pandemic, and we hear little about this in our part of the world. Hospitals have been collapsed for months, some are dying in the streets, the government restrictions and economic fall make it impossible for many people who live day-by-day to get what they need.” Pøbel Tne Lovers Detail. (photo courtesy of Pøbel) 100 % of this sale is going to a goo friend of his who has studied with and lived with different indigenous families for a decade, he says. “The indigenous people are strong and their ancestors have survived similar things in the past on their own, but this time I, like many others, would like to reach out a helping hand to try to do some good.” Pøbel Tne Lovers Detail. (photo courtesy of Pøbel) The Lovers AP Dirty test print 1/1 Unique 88 x 62 cm 34,6 x 24,4 In Conqueror Connoisseur 300 gsm paper Hand-printed 5% art tax included Signed and numbered DON'T FORGET TO CLICK ON THE LINK BELOW TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE PROJECT AND TO PLACE YOUR BID: Click here to learn more about the project and to place your bid. https://chuffed.org/project/covid?fbclid=IwAR2RMxd-Nns8UrP1Zb-Eh999IJpUGerHhuJLXsih_7hLVi0da4iKTTfgDgU
Jim Prigoff / BLM – Dispatch From Oakland“In some 50 years of documenting public art, I have never seen such an outpouring of political images as I have personally witnessed in the streets of San Francisco, Oakland and Sacramento, ” photographer and historian Jim Prigoff tells us. He’s been hitting the streets in the last week and feeling the rage and defiance of the protestors as well as the artists who are pouring themselves out onto colorful walls. Dered WRK. Oakland, CA. (photo © Jim Prigoff) He tells us that he has watched as tens of thousands of people continue to demonstrate every day. “Much of it is related to the murder of George Floyd,” he says, “and all that it portends relating to race relations and specifically the phrase that sums it all up is ‘BLACK LIVES MATTER’.” Dered WRK. Oakland, CA. (photo © Jim Prigoff) Limited in his personal mobility to shooting from his car window, Mr. Prigoff has an eagle’s eye when it comes to catching the good stuff and we are honored that he shares what he has found here with BSA readers. He says that he would like to disseminate his shots “in any way that helps to call attention to the continuing injustice and the absolute necessity for dramatic change.” Unidentified artist. Oakland, CA. (photo © Jim Prigoff) Unidentified artists. Oakland, CA. (photo © Jim Prigoff) Girl Mobb. Oakland, CA. (photo © Jim Prigoff) Unidentified artist. Oakland, CA. (photo © Jim Prigoff) Unidentified artists. Oakland, CA. (photo © Jim Prigoff) Unidentified artists. Oakland, CA. (photo © Jim Prigoff) Unidentified artists. Oakland, CA. (photo © Jim Prigoff)
AKUT / Join His CALL FOR ACTIONCALL FOR ACTION: PARTICIPATE IN A NEW VIDEO PROJECT Today we're lending a hand to Street Artist and fine artist AKUT, who is using his name and privilege to organize a new video project that he hopes will continue the momentum against racism that is currently marching through many of the world's streets. Let's ask all the questions about how a racists system is formed and if our actions or inactions and attitudes contribute to it knowingly or unknowingly. In the end, we're all responsible. Use the power of your voice, show your face to be an ally in this movement against racism, says AKUT in his new appeal for participants for his next video project. Be an amplifier for those who haven’t been heard for too long or have been shut down by officials and politics every time this ugly ball of violence gets another disturbing kick and rolls even faster. I aim to use my abilities to participate in this worldwide movement, to stand in for humanity, equality, and to keep this fight a VISIBLE one as long as it takes. Again, the time for change is NOW! A Message from AKUT I need you to help me creating another strong sign of solidarity with the whole act against racism. If you want to participate in a new video project, please send an email to: BLM@AKUT1.COMSUBJECT: BLM IN *YOUR CITY/COUNTRY*UNTIL WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17TH. All you need is a black and white printer, a camera (smartphone is sufficient), and the confidence to eventually make this change happen, step by step, together.Thank you a lot in advance! As a side note to all denier and conspiracy myths sympathetic, to the people, who have never been affected by racism, but keep on pointing out that all lives matter or saying this is not their problem: I don’t say ONLY black lives matter. I was lucky so far to never have been under pressure because of anything that defines me by nature. I don’t take this for granted. You shouldn’t either. It should be everybody’s duty to make this world a worth one, to live in, with equality, freedom, and solidarity as a common basement. It’s ridiculous and frustrating that one has to explicitly say that every life matters in order to not be attacked when standing up for others. There shouldn’t be any doubt about the value of lives, no matter the color of skin, gender, religion, social-economic or geographical background. In times when a specific group of human beings needs as much support as possible to be seen and heard, it should be a no-brainer to everyone, that this particular group needs to be underlined specifically in the public debate. Don’t mix this up or compare it to any other issue this world is facing. There’re for sure too many things not right on this planet, but we cannot act on all issues at the same time. This movement is against every act of alleged superiority over presumed minorities, against group-related misanthropy. This is against racism. - AKUT All the best from BerlinFalk aka AKUT
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BSA Images Of The Week: 06.14.20Welcome to BSA Images of the Week. It's great to see that artists on the streets are actually reaching out to help passersby with enthralling words of encouragement these days - the signs and messages we're seeing are sentiments such as We will persevere! and No Fear. Keep Going! Perhaps it is the vacuum of support that has been created by the Divider in Chief - as well as the acquiescent one-party corporate Demoblicans who all haven't the slightest desire to lead or actually support you in these times of crisis for millions. And to this we add our voice; Hang in there people! You got this! We are going to pull through this stronger and more united, despite the disinformation war that is arrayed before us. Today people are once again taking to the streets around the world in a populist fervor not seen since the '60s when Baby Boomers hadn't abandoned their principles yet. What a pendulum we swing on! Here’s our weekly interview with the streets, this week featuring Buff Monster, Dan Witz, Gianni Lee, Mtitya Pisliak, Praxi, Skewville, and Techno Deco. A Brooklyn Gen Z hippie invokes grandpa's favorite band, the Grateful Dead, to suggest that the way to solve racism is to get racists high. blacklivesmatter (photo © Jaime Rojo) #blacklivesmatter (photo © Jaime Rojo) blacklivesmatter (photo © Jaime Rojo) No Justice. No Peace. Defund the Police. (photo © Jaime Rojo) Sara Erenthal (photo © Jaime Rojo) Stop Gaslighting J Kos (photo © Jaime Rojo) Somehow, through every civic or societal chapter, Marilyn Monroe reappears in New York. Artist is called Almost Over Keep Smiling (photo © Jaime Rojo) Even skeletons wear masks for safety. Gianni Lee (photo © Jaime Rojo) Gianni Lee (photo © Jaime Rojo) No Fear. Keep Going Mitya Pisliak (photo © Jaime Rojo) We will persevere! Buff Monster (photo © Jaime Rojo) Praxis (photo © Jaime Rojo) Dan Witz (photo © Jaime Rojo) Techno Deco (photo © Jaime Rojo) Skewville still kicking around. (photo © Jaime Rojo) Untitled. Astoria, Queens. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
The Black Wall Movement / Barcelona Artists Fight RacismUnder the initiative of Barcelona based street artist, Xupet Negre, around 15 artists responded to an invitation to participate in the project #theblackwallmovement at Parc De 3 Xemeneies in Barcelona. Police brutality is not a foreign concept in Barcelona and the images coming out from the United States have hit a nerve within the creative community of this Catalan Metropolis, we are told, and the artists here decided to show their support for the protest against racism in Barcelona by painting these walls. Photographer and frequent BSA contributor Lluis Olive shared his photos of the project with us. *Absure (photo © Lluis Olive) Maga / Megui (photo © Lluis Olive) Art by an anonymous artist. Photo by an anonymous photographer. The anonymous artist(s) who painted the mural above, titled Here the police also kill decided to paint the names of a number of the immigrants killed by the police in Barcelona since the '90s. An individual who happened to be on the scene where the mural was painted and wishes to remain anonymous related the what unfolded once the police got wind of the mural: Here the police also kill...and censor! Yesterday I visited Parc De 3 Xemeneies in Barcelona to support #theblackwallsmovement event organized by Xupete Negre. I wasn't there as an artist, but rather in support of my fellow artists who were participating and painting in the event. What caught my attention was a mural where a crew of anonymous artists decided that rather than paint images on the wall they wrote a list of the names of immigrants assassinated by the police in Barcelona from the '90s to the present time. Shortly after the mural was completed a police squad arrived. The officers wanted to know the name of the artist(s) who painted the mural so they could charge the artist(s) of defamation and demanded that the mural be painted over. The artists who were present at the time refused to name names and refused to paint over the mural. The following day the portion of the mural that reads: Here the police also kills was painted over. I find it abhorrent that crimes that took place are being censured and that the collective memory of said crimes is being erased. Never mind that the event in question was to fight racism and police brutality and to denounce the murder of George Floyd in The United States. This is the end of pretty pictures, wrote the artists at the end of the mural. -by anonymous. Raul De Dios, Kram, Zosen, Eledu and Kader. (photo © Lluis Olive) Maga / Megui, Miriam Diaz, El Craneo, Camil. (photo © Lluis Olive) Miriam Diaz, El Craneo, Camil. (photo © Lluis Olive) Oreo / Tim Marsh (photo © Lluis Olive) Klover, SM172, ISA Rabassa, Gayoncerose, Gerardo. (photo © Lluis Olive) *3RL Crew (photo © Lluis Olive) *These two murals are not part of the event listed above and were painted a different location in Barcelona.
What To Do With Racists Monuments? – Banksy Has An IdeaAcross the United States and in other parts of the world protestors are bringing down the last vestiges of sculptural racism etched in marble or bronze. Statutes of slave traders and confederate generals have been pulled down from their pedestals. Even Christopher Columbus lost his head in Boston this week. So yes, heads are rolling. It’s not a moment too soon to have this conversation, to listen to others, and to confront the idea that we should revere and immortalize with monuments those who were not human enough to treat other humans fairly. The demonstrators protesting against racism and police violence are having an impact in our daily discourse on matters of race, violence against minorities, and police brutality. It’s not about time, it’s been time. Bristol, a seaside city in the United Kingdom saw its own symbol of racism toppled down by protestors this week. It involved the monument of Edward Colston, a Tory Member of Parliament and an English merchant who profitted from the slave trade and died in 1721. Bristol also gave us street artist Banksy, who looks to inject levity even in the darkest moments. He has come with an irresistible and clever idea about what to do with the monument that was thrown into the harbor at an anti-racism protest on Sunday, and has since been retrieved from the waters. Having already offered his serious commentary on the #blacklivesmatter movement on his Instagram account he decided to give us his humorous take on the fate of the statue. What should we do with the empty plinth in the middle of Bristol?Here’s an idea that caters for both those who miss the Colston statue and those who don’t.We drag him out the water, put him back on the plinth, tie cable round his neck and commission some life size bronze statues of protestors in the act of pulling him down. Everyone happy. A famous day commemorated. Bansky