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The May jobs report had 'misclassification error' that made the unemployment rate look lower than it is. Here's what happenedWhen the U.S. government's official jobs report for May came out on Friday, it included a note at the bottom saying there had been a major "error" and the unemployment rate likely should be higher than the widely report 13.3 percent rate. The special note said that if this misclassification error had not occurred, the "overall unemployment rate would have been about 3 percentage points higher than reported," meaning the unemployment rate would be about 16.3 percent for May. The Bureau of Labor Statistics, the agency that puts out the monthly jobs reports, said it was working to fix the problem. "BLS and the Census Bureau are investigating why this misclassification error continues to occur and are taking additional steps to address the issue," said a note at the bottom of the Bureau of Labor Statistics report. Some took this as a sign that President Donald Trump or one of his staffers might have tinkered with the data to make it look better, especially since most forecasters predicted the unemployment rate would be close to 20 percent in May, up from 14.7 percent in April. But economists and former BLS leaders from across the political strongly dismissed the idea that Trump or anyone else tampered with the data. Economists say the BLS was trying to be as transparent as possible about how hard it is to collect real-time data during a pandemic. The BLS admitted that some people who should have been classified as "temporarily unemployed" during the shutdown were instead misclassified as employed but "absent" from work for...
Prosecutor: 2 Buffalo police charged with assault in shovingBUFFALO, N.Y. (AP) - Two Buffalo police officers were charged with assault Saturday, prosecutors said, after a video showed them shoving a 75-year-old protester in recent demonstrations over the death of George Floyd. Robert McCabe and Aaron Torgalski, who surrendered Saturday morning, pleaded not guilty to second-degree assault. They were released without bail. McCabe, 32, and Torgalski, 39, "crossed a line" when they shoved the man down hard enough for him to crack his head on the ground, Erie County District Attorney John Flynn said at a news conference, calling the victim "a harmless 75-year-old man." The officers had been suspended without pay Friday after a TV crew captured the confrontation the night before near the end of protests. If convicted of the felony assault charge, they face up to seven years in prison. Phone messages were left on Saturday with their lawyers. The footage shows the man, identified as longtime activist Martin Gugino, approaching a line of helmeted officers holding batons as they clear demonstrators from Niagara Square around the time of an 8 p.m. curfew. Two officers push Gugino backward, and he hits his head on the pavement. Blood spills as officers walk past. One officer leans down to check on the injured man before another officer urges the colleague to keep walking. The police officers "knew this was bad," Flynn said of the video. "Look at their body language." The video of the encounter sparked outrage online as demonstrators take to cities across the country to protest racial injustice sparked by the death of George Floyd, a black man who died after a white police officer pressed a knee into his neck for several minutes. "I think there was criminal liability from what I saw on the video," Gov. Andrew Cuomo...
California official to review Vallejo police after shootingsSACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) - California Attorney General Xavier Becerra announced Friday that his office will review the Vallejo Police Department and recommend reforms to use-of-force policies and measures involving bias and community policing. The announcement came days after officers shot and killed a 22-year-old man suspected of stealing amid a night of protests. "This review and reform agreement we announce today with the city of Vallejo represents a critical step the Vallejo Police Department must take to build trust with people who have lost faith in them," Becerra said. He said the review was tied to recent high-profile officer-involved shootings, not a specific incident. "We've been working with leaders in Vallejo for quite some time to reach this agreement," Becerra said. Police Chief Shawny Williams said he has implemented a number of reforms since taking over the department, including a stronger body-worn camera policy, improved de-escalation policy, and a program to regularly analyze use-of-force data. "But the biggest steps are ahead of us," he said. "I welcome all voices to the table. We are stronger together." A similar review of Sacramento police after the fatal police shooting of Stephon Clark found in 2019 that the department should clarify policies on use of force and firearms and end the use of chokeholds. Vallejo police responding to reports of a break-in at a pharmacy early Tuesday initially said Sean Monterrosa had a firearm in the waistband of his pants, but the item turned out to be a hammer. Police said Monterrosa was on his knees with his arms raised when an officer shot five times from behind a police windshield, hitting him once. "My brother was kneeling and surrendering, yet you shot my brother from your vehicle...
Virus exposes sharp economic divide: College vs. non-collegeBALTIMORE (AP) - For an American workforce under continuing threat from the coronavirus, the best protection might just be a college degree. Friday's jobs report for May delivered a major pleasant surprise, with lower unemployment and 2.5 million added jobs, instead of the darkening picture that had been widely expected. Yet the damage inflicted on the job market since February has highlighted a widening line of inequality based on education. In a nation in which a majority of workers lack a degree, college graduates are far more likely to be inoculated from the pain. In May, the overall unemployment rate was 13.3%, down from 14.7% in April. For workers with only a high school diploma, the jobless rate was 15.3%. For college graduates, it was just 7.4%. Fewer than half of high school graduates are now working. Two-thirds of college graduates are. The roughly 20 million jobs lost in the aftermath of the coronavirus are amplifying the economic inequalities between college graduates and other workers that have been evident for years, said Anthony Carnevale, director of the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce, who has long studied the topic. "It's laying bare the class and racial differences in America," Carnevale said. "It's very plain to see because it all shows up in the data." At a time when advanced education has become increasingly vital to household prosperity, nearly two-thirds of Americans lack a college degree. About 90% of the jobs that were added during the first three years of the Trump presidency went to college graduates. Census Bureau figures show that the average college graduate's income is twice as high as high school-only workers. And at a moment when the country is confronting the challenges of racism and police...
Peaceful protests continue into weekend around CaliforniaSAN FRANCISCO (AP) - Protesters marched, paddled, cycled and even staged "die-ins" as outrage over the death of George Floyd expressed itself in peaceful but colorful ways around California. Crowds ranging from hundreds to thousands thronged the streets Friday in downtown Los Angeles, San Diego, Sacramento, San Francisco and smaller communities. More protests were planned Saturday, including a march across the Golden Gate Bridge. "I hear them saying all lives matter, but right now, it's our lives that are chalk lines on the ground," one woman who took part in a Black Lives Matter protest in Riverside told KABC-TV. "We just ask can we be taken into custody, instead of the morgue." In recent days the demonstrations have been boisterous but non-violent, in contrast to last weekend when a minority of protesters smashed windows, burned police cars and confronted cordons of riot-clad police who fired tear gas and rubber bullets. Gone, too, was most of the looting that ransacked dozens of stores and which authorities say appeared mainly to be the work of non-protesters. Cities and counties have begun easing or ending curfews that resulted in the arrests of thousands of demonstrators and on Friday, Gov. Gavin Newsom urged local authorities to end reliance on thousands of California National Guard troops who were deployed to major cities, saying "conditions have changed for the positive." He suggested they could be redeployed to food banks that are helping people affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. In Los Angeles, thousands of flowers were placed on the sidewalk outside the county Hall of Justice after people were asked to bring roses symbolizing people they believe were victims of state violence. At City Hall, demonstrators chanted "no more names" and sang "Happy Birthday" on the 27th birthday of...
Biden formally clinches Democratic presidential nominationWASHINGTON (AP) - Joe Biden formally clinched the Democratic presidential nomination Friday, setting him up for a bruising challenge to President Donald Trump that will play out against the unprecedented backdrop of a pandemic, economic collapse and civil unrest. "It was an honor to compete alongside one of the most talented groups of candidates the Democratic party has ever fielded," Biden said in a statement Friday night, "and I am proud to say that we are going into this general election a united party." The former vice president has effectively been his party's leader since his last challenger in the Democratic primary, Bernie Sanders, ended his campaign in April. But Biden pulled together the 1,991 delegates needed to become the nominee after seven states and the District of Columbia held presidential primaries Tuesday. Biden reached the threshold three days after the primaries because several states, overwhelmed by huge increases in mail ballots, took days to tabulate results. Teams of analysts at The Associated Press then parsed the votes into individual congressional districts. Democrats award most delegates to the party's national convention based on results in individual congressional districts. Biden now has 1,993 delegates, with contests still to come in eight states and three U.S. territories. The moment was met with little of the traditional fanfare as the nation confronts overlapping crises. While Biden has started to venture out more this week, the coronavirus pandemic has largely confined him to his Wilmington, Delaware, home for much of the past three months. The country faces the worst rate of unemployment since the Great Depression. And civil unrest that harkens back to the 1960s has erupted in dozens of cities following the death of George Floyd, a black man who died when a white...
Jordan giving $100 million for racial equality, justiceCHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) - Michael Jordan and the Jordan Brand are giving $100 million to organizations dedicated to promoting racial equality and social justice. In a joint statement Friday on social media, Jordan and the Jordan Brand said money will be paid over 10 years with the goal of "ensuring racial equality, social justice and greater access to education." "Black lives matter," the statement said. "This isn't a controversial statement. Until the ingrained racism that allows our country's institutions to fail is completely eradicated, we will remain committed to protecting and improving the lives of black people." Jordan, the 57-year-old former Chicago Bulls great, is the owner of the Charlotte Hornets. The Jordan Brand is a subsidiary of Nike, the shoe giant that earlier Friday committed $40 million over the next four years to support the black community. Jordan also released a statement Monday on George Floyd and the killings of black people at the hands of police. "I am deeply saddened, truly pained and plain angry," Jordan said. "I see and feel everyone's pain, outrage and frustration. I stand with those who are calling out the ingrained racism and violence toward people of color in our country. We have had enough." Floyd was in handcuffs when a Minneapolis police officer pressed his knee into his neck as he pleaded that he couldn't breathe. Derek Chauvin is charged with third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter.
LeBron James, told by Laura Ingraham to 'shut up and dribble,' calls her out over Drew BreesLeBron James couldn't help but notice that Fox News host Laura Ingraham, who once dismissed political comments he made by telling him to "shut up and dribble," was far more encouraging of Drew Brees' criticism of protests during the national anthem. In an animated post Thursday on Twitter, the Los Angeles Lakers star told his 46.3 million followers that "this treatment right here," referring to Ingraham's remarks the night before, helps explain "why the protesting is going on" in the first place. On Ingraham's show Wednesday, she declared that Brees "finds himself in this scalding cauldron of hate," after the New Orleans Saints quarterback said earlier in the day that he "will never agree with anybody disrespecting the flag of the United States of America or our country." With protests roiling the country in the wake of the killing of an unarmed black man, George Floyd, by a white police officer, Brees had been asked if NFL fans could expect to again see demonstrations against police brutality and racial injustice, as first staged by former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick, when the league resumes play. Brees' comments immediately drew a huge backlash, including from some Saints teammates and from James, and on Thursday the quarterback issued an apology for making "comments that were insensitive and completely missed the mark on the issues we are facing right now as a country." To Ingraham, though, Brees should have been "allowed to have his view of what kneeling and the flag means to him." "I mean, he's a person," she said. "He has some worth, I would imagine. "This is beyond football, though," Ingraham continued. "This is totalitarian conduct. This is Stalinist." Ingraham struck a different tone in early 2018, after James and fellow NBA standout...