@tommelling
Tom Melling
Proper Hand Washing For Nurseshttp://www.Jobs-Nurse.com FREE FOR NURSES AND FREE FOR EMPLOYERS...Everyone Wins:) Website | http://www.jobs-nurse.com Facebook | http://www.facebook.com/Jobs4Nurses Twitter | https://twitter.com/JobsNurseCom An incredibly overlooked factor in today's modern world is the importance of hand washing. All healthcare professionals have an innate duty to try to promote and maintain their patient's health, as well as to strive to prevent contaminations or infections. It is shown that the number one control method for preventing infection is proper hand washing. The necessary ingredients are quite simple -- soap and water. Make sure if you are wearing sleeves, that they are rolled up past your elbow. Remove all jewelry or adornments on hands and wet them thoroughly. Take enough soap to cover all sides of your hands, then rub palm to palm, before rubbing palm of hand to back of hand with fingers interlaced, on both sides. Proceed to rub palm to palm again, with fingers interlaced. Then palm to palm with fingers cupped and interlaced, to be followed by rotational rubbing of each thumb. To top off this epic procedure, use the tips of your fingers to rub the opposite palm in a circular motion, ending with a brisk rotational rub of your wrists and forearms. After all of this is complete, you may rinse. Quite the event, right? Watch this video to make sure you actually know how to properly wash your hands. FREE FOR NURSES...FREE FOR EMPLOYERS. Post your Resume. Our goal is to connect quality nursing professionals with opportunities in the health industry that meet their needs. Find quality nursing professionals. From Medical Assistants, CNA to Director of Nursing. We specialize in providing nursing recruiters with best of the best.
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Efficacy of hydroxychloroquine in patients with COVID-19: results of a randomized clinical trialAims: Studies have indicated that chloroquine (CQ) shows antagonism against COVID-19 in vitro. However, evidence regarding its effects in patients is limited. This study aims to evaluate the efficacy of hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) in the treatment of patients with COVID-19. Main methods: From February 4 to February 28, 2020, 62 patients suffering from COVID-19 were diagnosed and admitted to Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University. All participants were randomized in a parallel-group trial, 31 patients were assigned to receive an additional 5-day HCQ (400 mg/d) treatment, Time to clinical recovery (TTCR), clinical characteristics, and radiological results were assessed at baseline and 5 days after treatment to evaluate the effect of HCQ. Key findings: For the 62 COVID-19 patients, 46.8% (29 of 62) were male and 53.2% (33 of 62) were female, the mean age was 44.7 (15.3) years. No difference in the age and sex distribution between the control group and the HCQ group. But for TTCR, the body temperature recovery time and the cough remission time were significantly shortened in the HCQ treatment group. Besides, a larger proportion of patients with improved pneumonia in the HCQ treatment group (80.6%, 25 of 31) compared with the control group (54.8%, 17 of 31). Notably, all 4 patients progressed to severe illness that occurred in the control group. However, there were 2 patients with mild adverse reactions in the HCQ treatment group. Significance: Among patients with COVID-19, the use of HCQ could significantly shorten TTCR and promote the absorption of pneumonia. ### Competing Interest Statement The authors have declared no competing interest. ### Clinical Trial ChiCTR2000029559 ### Funding Statement This study was supported by the Epidemiological Study of COVID-19 Pneumonia to Science and Technology Department of Hubei Province (2020FCA005). ### Author Declarations All relevant ethical guidelines have been followed; any necessary IRB and/or ethics committee approvals have been obtained and details of the IRB/oversight body are included in the manuscript. Yes All necessary patient/participant consent has been obtained and the appropriate institutional forms have been archived. Yes I understand that all clinical trials and any other prospective interventional studies must be registered with an ICMJE-approved registry, such as ClinicalTrials.gov. I confirm that any such study reported in the manuscript has been registered and the trial registration ID is provided (note: if posting a prospective study registered retrospectively, please provide a statement in the trial ID field explaining why the study was not registered in advance). Yes I have followed all appropriate research reporting guidelines and uploaded the relevant EQUATOR Network research reporting checklist(s) and other pertinent material as supplementary files, if applicable. Yes The dataset supporting the conclusions of this article is included within the article.
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Saliva is more sensitive for SARS-CoV-2 detection in COVID-19 patients than nasopharyngeal swabsRapid and accurate SARS-CoV-2 diagnostic testing is essential for controlling the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. The current gold standard for COVID-19 diagnosis is real-time RT-PCR detection of SARS-CoV-2 from nasopharyngeal swabs. Low sensitivity, exposure risks to healthcare workers, and global shortages of swabs and personal protective equipment, however, necessitate the validation of new diagnostic approaches. Saliva is a promising candidate for SARS-CoV-2 diagnostics because (1) collection is minimally invasive and can reliably be self-administered and (2) saliva has exhibited comparable sensitivity to nasopharyngeal swabs in detection of other respiratory pathogens, including endemic human coronaviruses, in previous studies. To validate the use of saliva for SARS-CoV-2 detection, we tested nasopharyngeal and saliva samples from confirmed COVID-19 patients and self-collected samples from healthcare workers on COVID-19 wards. When we compared SARS-CoV-2 detection from patient-matched nasopharyngeal and saliva samples, we found that saliva yielded greater detection sensitivity and consistency throughout the course of infection. Furthermore, we report less variability in self-sample collection of saliva. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that saliva is a viable and more sensitive alternative to nasopharyngeal swabs and could enable at-home self-administered sample collection for accurate large-scale SARS-CoV-2 testing. ### Competing Interest Statement The authors have declared no competing interest. ### Funding Statement Funding sources had no role in study design, data collection, data analysis, data interpretation, or writing of the report. The corresponding authors had full access to all data in the study and had final responsibility for the decision to submit for publication. ### Author Declarations All relevant ethical guidelines have been followed; any necessary IRB and/or ethics committee approvals have been obtained and details of the IRB/oversight body are included in the manuscript. Yes All necessary patient/participant consent has been obtained and the appropriate institutional forms have been archived. Yes I understand that all clinical trials and any other prospective interventional studies must be registered with an ICMJE-approved registry, such as ClinicalTrials.gov. I confirm that any such study reported in the manuscript has been registered and the trial registration ID is provided (note: if posting a prospective study registered retrospectively, please provide a statement in the trial ID field explaining why the study was not registered in advance). Yes I have followed all appropriate research reporting guidelines and uploaded the relevant EQUATOR Network research reporting checklist(s) and other pertinent material as supplementary files, if applicable. Yes All data generated and/or analysed during the current study are available from the corresponding author on reasonable request.
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